Spoon Test Factory

Spoon Test Factory (2006) is a short film about Marie, played by Beth Gillin, and Geoff, played by Brian Egendorf (MainFragger), who work in a factory where spoons are tested.

Spoon Testing
Beth Gillin as Marie and Brian Egendorf as Geoff

The idea behind the film was to shoot something that was visual and not dialogue-driven. I also wanted to write a script but not actually give the actors a copy of the screenplay. So while significant events in the film are structured, much of what happens on the screen was worked out in rehearsal through solutions the actors arrived at by improvisation. The script was written in Celtx.

The final point that bears mentioning is that Tim and I met Beth, Brian, and Andrew Salerno, the film’s director of photography, at the Philadelphia Filmmakers, Actors, & Screenwriters Syndicate, which is held at Katseye Studio in Philadelphia, PA.

Other Specs

Format: HDV
Location: Studio 5 South
Run Time: 6 minutes 20 seconds
Date of Principal Photography: September 24, 2006

If you have trouble viewing this movie, please dowload Quicktime 7.

8 thoughts on “Spoon Test Factory

  1. This was a lot of fun to work on for me. In and out and finished. Beth, Brian, and Andrew were really easy to work with, but Thom was a giant pain the ass as usual.

  2. Thanks, it comes very naturally to me. Raw talent.

    Seriously though – Beth, Brain and Andrew it was great working with you. The short looks outstanding.

    Mike and Tim – I expect nothing less.

  3. Good point! Who DID play the arms? Will Spoon Test Factory II reveal how Marie managed the crab bisque with a fork? Gotta know, or I’m gonna die.

  4. I’ll have to third the “Nice”.

    Re arms: Those look vaguely like pasty white loki arms to me.

    Re soup: Bisque can be pretty rich. Could be one of those “soup so thick you can stick a fork in it and eat it like a popcicle” type deals.

  5. I think that this may be my favorite of your works so far. While it retains your usual spirit of light-hearted goofiness, there is a maturity here that I haven’t seen before. Bravo!

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